Banner - Military

About Us | Site Map | Archaeology | Archives | Articles | Biographies | Cemeteries | Decades - 1900s | Collection | Districts | Heritage Walks | Historic Buildings | Lodges | Military | Newspapers | Photographs | Poems | Rate Payers | Roads | School Registers |
Women
| 1913 Strike

 

Te Miro Soldier's Cottage 1919 - Sketch by Kay Walsh

About Us

Site Map

Military Index

 

 

 

In 1916 the Government purchased James Taylor's 1,200 acre Te Miro property for soldier settlement. Except for 2,000 acres of run-down pasture on the top terrace, known as 'the old race course', the block was mainly in bush, scrub and fern. Access was by way of the Sanatorium Hill and along a clay road for four miles. Later a road via Fencourt and Flume Road was formed.

The settlement was advertised as 'first class land adjoining Te Waikato Sanatorium and Fencourt and Whitehall settlements'. A portion was said to be suitable for dairying, the balance being grazing land suitable for sheep and cattle. The settlement was well watered by streams and springs and there was a creamery about three miles distant in the Fencourt settlement. The nearest post office was Cambridge, but there was a mail delivery five days a week at the sanatorium by a coach belonging to that establishment.

The first ballot was 27 February 1918 and the returned soldiers to receive farms were:-

Name

Army Number

Section

Acres

 

Percy Wallace Sampson

5/46

68

99

 

Frank Keyte

17/105

17

193

 

Charles Fredr Victor Roberts

13/2363

67

10

*

Stephen Christopher Kiddell

13/1694

14

102

 

Alfred Bergquist

13/257

5

226

#

William Septimus Bradshaw

13/9

64

11

#

David Causer Mitchell

21302

2

234

#

Kenneth Arthur Hankins

13/801

11

160

*

Jas Francis Mulholland

12/3536

12

135

*

Herbert Oliver Lamb

23/1915

13

130

#

Ivan Dyche Woodroffe

5/528

15

205

 

Chas Claude Craig

12/71

30

121

*

Norman Reginald Davenport

R N A S

35

389

#

Stewart Dawson Low

12/3081

38

228

 

Alfred Ernest Jamieson

10097

39

290

 

Cochrane Ferrall

7/1068

66

99

 

Stephen Joseph Geary

12/737

69

361

 

William David Rennie

46859

35

787

 

George Moore

2/907

40

98

 

Samual Neels

4/655

10

225

*

William Jas Elliot

24/1651

18

181

 

Alexander McInnes

11/2768

26

233

 

John Henry Brock

17558

4

227

*

Robert Brinkworth

13725

16

103

*

James Isaac Needham

26/126

27

316

*

Jas Henry Lonergan

2/249

28

208

*

Ernest Jas Evans

 

28

323

#

Henry George Rodewald

22868

22

92

#

Walter Robert Burr

22934

10

225

#

Henry Albert Print

8/4208

29

207

#

William McKee

23020

7

226

#

Frederick Ernest Walker

11/1610

69

361

#

By 1920 nine settlers had forfeited their land * and more soldiers tried their luck.

William Richard Shaw

13/851

36

80

 

Harold William Bennett

14/95

8, 44, 45

139

 

Hardrood Mackinder

17/384

34

564

 

Oscar Johnson

26112

1, 9

434

#

Alan Stuart Grey

13/62

20

227

 

Reginald Willson Brown

10138

66

99

 

Harold Kidd

42124

31

332

#

Andrew Curnow

 

29

207

 

David Forde Livingstone

23/812

33

166

 

Jas H S Bamforth

10/954

65

102

 

Hugh Pierpont Hewitt

21152

(21)22,23,77

(142)461

 

Bernard Parker de Lautour

9/2029

32, 70

669

 

Andrew Christie

25261

1

227

 

Percival John Hill

24/1077

30

121

#

Bessie Keyte

22/134

14

102

 

John Henry Scarlet

34440

11

162

#

William Lionel de Lautour

9/30

28

208

 

Victor Harold Lynds

12/401

2/27

159

#

John Anderson Thompson

26717

13

130

 

Archibald Paton

15766

41

79

 

By 1925 another sixteen soldiers had forfeited #.

Ref: Register of Returned Soldiers at National Archives Wellington

Many factors were responsible for the initial failure of the settlement and the abandonment by many soldier settlers of their farms. The main reasons were the lack of financial assistance by the government and the depression of 1921 when butter was 8d a pound and wool dropped to 6d a pound. They had to pay £80 per ton for wire while cartage cost for timber exceeded that of the material. In July 1921 the settlers again asked for a remission in rent.

Another setback was a plague of rabbits and, with deer and pigs, crops just disappeared over night. It was not until the Maungakawa Rabbit Board was formed in 1920 that it was possible to farm more economically. Mr Bamforth, in a talk to the Cambridge Historical Society in 1958, recalled that he 'lived in a tent for three months before building a two-roomed shack'.

A number of the soldier farmers were determined to battle on and made remarkable progress in spite of predictions that the settlement was doomed to failure.

If you find someone or something of interest in this index click here to contact us with as much relevant detail as possible.
Our research fees are here.

 

Researched and written by Eris Parker
Ref: Cambridge Museum Archives
National Archives Wellington

 

 

Disclaimer:
While all due care has been taken to verify information contained on this site, the Cambridge Museum accepts no responsibility for any errors, omissions or misrepresentation.

Copyright © 2003 - Cambridge Museum - All Rights Reserved.

Banner
Contact us